Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

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Kroy
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Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by Kroy » Tue Aug 27, 2019 8:11 am

What's the musical notation/expression for 'break tempo' or mot following any particular tempo, leaving it up to musician's discression?
Can't seem to find it via google..
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michelp
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by michelp » Tue Aug 27, 2019 10:42 am

Rubato (freely) is frequently used.
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Michel R E
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by Michel R E » Tue Aug 27, 2019 1:22 pm

"senza rigore"?
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David Ward
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by David Ward » Tue Aug 27, 2019 3:11 pm

‘liberamente’ or ‘tempo non giusto’ and others depending on the level and type of freedom appropriate. If (like me) you often use English language tempo directions,‘Free tempo’ would do.
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N Grossingink
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by N Grossingink » Tue Aug 27, 2019 3:27 pm

In jazz, "ad lib." is used frequently and has universal meaning. However, depending on the musical context, it may imply a little more freedom than desired.
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zuill
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by zuill » Tue Aug 27, 2019 5:08 pm

I've used Free Tempo, or Tempo ad lib. Out of Time is another one I've seen.

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motet
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by motet » Tue Aug 27, 2019 5:43 pm

HAMLET: The time is out of joint. O cursed spite / That ever I was born to set it right!

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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by Anders Hedelin » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:57 pm

motet wrote:HAMLET: The time is out of joint. O cursed spite / That ever I was born to set it right!
It sounds as if Hamlet might have been a music engraver - not widely known.
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Nick Mazuk
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by Nick Mazuk » Tue Aug 27, 2019 8:24 pm

I've also seen a piacere, meaning "at your pleasure/will", which will signal that it doesn't have to be strictly in time.

In terms of other suggestions already here:

Rubato: Specifically means to steal time. The assumption is typically that if you are going to take some time here, you're going to make it up later. Often this works by slowing down initially, then speeding up even more than the original tempo so you end where you would have if you had not changed tempo.

Senza Rigore: Technically means "without rigor or strictness". This would sound very similar (if not identical to) a piacere, though the translation has a different meaning.

Liberamente: Translates to "freely". Again, being free with the time with a slightly different translation.

Tempo non Giusto: Translates to "not in exact time". Doesn't necessarily mean the time is free or non-existent, just means it's not precise.

Free Time: This is exactly what you're looking for if you want to use English.

Ad Lib: Means "at one's pleasure", and is often used for improve or some other indeterminate aspect of the music.

Tempo Ad Lib.: Meaning the "time is at one's pleasure". If you're specifically wanting to break the tempo, use this over ad lib. as it's more precise and has more clarity.

Out of Time: Another good English term to use to get the results you want.

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In general, "music terms" often are just Italian words for what we want to achieve. Nowadays it's perfectly valid to use English instead (and it's growing popularity). I don't want to discount any of the other suggestions on this thread so far, but I believe it's important that if you're going to use the Italian that you know exactly what the terms mean. Then you can choose the most appropriate one for the job.
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miker
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by miker » Tue Aug 27, 2019 8:58 pm

And, of course, Sing a la soprano...
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Anders Hedelin
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Re: Musical notation for 'break tempo?'

Post by Anders Hedelin » Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:29 am

Also 'col soprano', 'colla parte' etc., meaning that you should accompany a soloist in a flexible tempo. I'm not sure how this is put in English.
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